0
\$\begingroup\$

I see that most radio modules have a metal shield. Is it for keeping the radio waves inside? If so, could a shield be too thick for its purpose? For instance, if one solders another piece of metal plate on it, would it cause any issue? Perhaps, void the FCC certification?

Thanks

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

So long as you don't damage the integrity of the metal shield, you can do pretty much anything you want to it. Certainly, soldering another piece of metal to it shouldn't be a problem. Just be careful not to overheat the components that the shield is covering.

Do note that the metal shield is often where the manufacturer's model number and certification markings go. You don't want to cover or damage those markings because that can invalidate the certification.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ The model number printing is actually wrong (I know with certainty)! So I was wondering if I could update it to the right one, which is approved by FCC, by soldering a plate on top. \$\endgroup\$ – Kar Apr 18 '15 at 20:31
1
\$\begingroup\$

Well, adding a piece on the outside of a shield shouldn't change the RF characteristics. However, how you attach that piece could be an issue. The shield works by isolating the environment inside from the outside world as much as possible. This has two effects, it prevents external RF energy from entering the enclosed area and it also prevents RF energy from leaking out. It does this by reflecting the RF energy. This can actually cause rather significant issues inside the enclosure as you can end up with resonances at problematic frequencies. One common method for dealing with this is the use of RF absorbing materials inside the enclosure. In many cases these materials come in the form of foam or rubber, and they can be quite sensitive to heat. If you're sure that there is nothing of the sort inside the shield, then there should be no issues soldering on another piece of metal. You're still going to have to be careful that you don't melt the solder of any components on the board, though.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.