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I am trying to power a pump that requires 12 Volts and 7 Amps to run. I have looked around but cannot seem to find a power supply capable of the voltage and the current. Does anyone know where would be a good place to find something like this?

(If an off the shelf power supply is not affordable) Is there some simple combination components to go from 110V AC to 12V DC and deliver the 7A?

I have to admit I am not very well informed in this field, so any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What about a computer power supply? They have 12V rails and can source quite a bit of current. \$\endgroup\$ – Mewa Apr 23 '15 at 20:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ How would I go about wiring one up to the pump? \$\endgroup\$ – Tyler Apr 23 '15 at 20:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ External in what sense? Just something you can easily connect to? Then yes, there are lots of tutorials online (for example this one or this one). People use these for lab bench power supplies these days. \$\endgroup\$ – Mewa Apr 23 '15 at 20:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ That is perfect, I will defenitely look into that. Thank you very much for the help. \$\endgroup\$ – Tyler Apr 23 '15 at 20:20
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There are plenty of decent quality 'enclosed' (you will likely have to add an external enclosure for safety etc.) switching power supplies in the $50 range with 12V output and good for more than 7A, however you may wish to determine what the requirements are for starting. As well, depending on the pump, the current may vary significantly during each cycle. You might find you actually need a 350W supply to start and run an 84W (running) pump.

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There are many companies that make industrial power supplies capable of 12V and 7A, or way more--such as Meanwell, PULS, or Lambda, to name a few. These are available in enclosed, open frame, DIN mount, and other form factors. Whether or not you consider them affordable is something only you can answer--for ~100W you're looking at probably in the $20-60 ballpark.

Mouser, Digikey, and other similar electronics suppliers will have these listed in a nice searchable form. For DIN rail format supplies, you may have better luck at an automation supplier.

You could use a very simple arrangement of components to make your own power supply--all you need is a transformer, a few diodes to make a bridge rectifier, and some capacitors to smooth the output, however to get 12V and 7A out of such a simple power supply will not be very efficient or demonstrate very good regulation--and it will be very heavy due to the large transformer required. For better efficiency, you'd need a switching power supply, which is decidedly NOT a simple arrangement of components, particularly if you care about safety, reliability, or EMC.

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Dell DA2 'brick' power supplies for small format PCS can be found very cheaply in surplus. They provide 12v at 17A and even have a remote switch (just cut off the silly Dell plug).

I use 5 in series to charge my electric bike.

I have also run then in parallel (with a couple of low forward voltage diodes to isolate the supplies) to double up on current. They make ideal supplies for a heated bed on a 3D printer.

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