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I've been buying wire-to-wire and wire-to-board Molex connectors that look like this:

enter image description here

from a local hardware store for years (the image is taken from SparkFun, which sells them with the crimp terminals and wire pre-installed).

I'd now like to buy a large number of them from an online supplier (e.g., DigiKey or Molex themselves) but I can't figure out what specific type of Molex connector they are. Molex's site has quite a variety of connectors and I'm finding it difficult to determine which product line these ones belong to.

Their pitch is approximately 2.5 mm (possibly 2.54) and they use crimp terminals that are held in place by a raised metal "flap" (one per terminal) that catches on a narrow rectangular hole in the plastic casing (in the photo above, these holes are on the underside of the female end of the connector).

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    \$\begingroup\$ Just curious: how is this question (which was asked in 2015) a duplicate of a question that was asked in 2017? Is the more recent question not a duplicate of this one? \$\endgroup\$ – Reign of Error Apr 26 '17 at 19:47
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Its a Molex KK 254 type connector (or just Molex KK) - or equivalent from other manufacturers. They are pretty common.

You are correct, they are 2.54mm pitch, or 0.1".

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is a KF2510-2P connector not a Molex branded connector. \$\endgroup\$ – Zhro Nov 12 '18 at 11:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Zhro it could very well be either. The Molex-KK series came first. The part number you specify is an "equivalent" by some unspecified manufacturer. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Nov 12 '18 at 11:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ I wasn't aware that it was an equivalent connector. I'll update my answer accordingly. \$\endgroup\$ – Zhro Nov 12 '18 at 11:57
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They are molex kk connectors. Specifically the variant with "locking ramp". IIRC theres also a couple of different lengths of locking ramp, you seem to have the ones with the large locking ramp.

(replace xx in the part numbers below with the pin count you want)

22-01-2xx5 for the housing 22-27-2xx1 for the PCB header 08-50-0032 for the terminals

Unfortunately while i've seen PC accessories with cable mount male variants of this connector molex don't seem to sell a male version intended for cable mounting. You can solder and heatshrink wires to the PCB mount connectors but it's a bit of a pain.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Additionally, the PCB header used inline and soldered to wires tends to beeak the wires when disconnecting the female terminal. The entire KK family was designed and marketed as a wire to board solution. Despite the usefulness of a wire to wire male connector, for whatever unfathomable reason, they refuse to develop it, presumably that it's too small a market share to be profitable, though it seems more like stubbornness and vanity than rational utility. They don't make housings, terminals or even crimp tools capable of making these connectors. It's proving hard to locate these items. \$\endgroup\$ – user314159 Feb 2 '17 at 23:57
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This is most likely a KF2510-2P connector as these are ubiquitous and can be acquired cheaply nowadays. They are very popular among businesses that sell kits such as SparkFun Electronics. These connectors can be found in various pin counts and orientations. They are very popular in China. The "KF2510" designation seems to be an equivalent to the Molex KK 254 (which came first).

Note that the 2P portion of the part/model for this type of connector indicates that it has two pins.

Because this equivalent connector is ubiquitous in China, it can be obtained easily and very cheaply in either small or large quantities from both eBay and AliExpress. I don't know if it's possible to source KF2510 on a reel for a large production run as this part number doesn't seem to have a listing with the parts distributors I looked at. In this case, you would want to source the Molex KK 254 specificlaly, usually from either DigiKey or Mouser Electronics.

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