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Do you use any protective gloves while soldering?

It has happened to me a lot that hot solderer touches my fingers.

I am not sure if protective gloves would reduce freedom of my fingers for their right job. Maybe I cannot keep many tiny elements properly.

What type of protective gloves do you use when soldering?

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Absolutely! Protective gloves reduce the absorption of chemicals through the skin, which is quite recommended for workers to wear while soldering.

Characteristics: Abrasion resistant, Anti-cutting, Fireproofing, Heat insulation, Blocking radiation and Insulation to some degree. enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welding and soldering are two very different things. Please don't confuse people by mixing up the terms. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Apr 3 '19 at 10:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ In some countries, welding is the same word used for soldering when translated. One sees that a lot in the Arduino forum; can be confusing the first time soldering is referred to like that. \$\endgroup\$ – CrossRoads Apr 3 '19 at 13:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Crossroads: It is still incorrect in English. Given that Eileen has an enormous ad for the PCB fabrication company she works for in her profile, I'd expect her to know that. It otherwise makes her company look rather unprofessional. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Apr 3 '19 at 13:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CrossRoads Indeed, especially in China from where the answerer is. Anyway, I just changed it. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Apr 3 '19 at 13:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JRE I marked this down as spam but it was declined. Elieen has since been temporarily suspended. How to flag a user and not their post as spam? (Somewhat of Leslie Meyers in the Truth and Advertising episode of South Park) \$\endgroup\$ – winny Apr 3 '19 at 13:54
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I use nitrile gloves. Not really for heat protection but to keep chemicals and stuff off my hands. I don't lose any dexterity since I use tweezers and hemostats to grab anything smaller than a pencil width anyways, even if I'm not wearing gloves.

It does protect against the occasional sputter or brief brush with the iron (which is why I don't wear latex because it melts more easily and can be even worse than just getting burned), but neither of these should be happening anyways. You shouldn't be getting splashed so much. You're doing something really wrong in your handling.

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No. The loss of dexterity is also not worth it. Solder is only bad touching your fingers if it contains lead, and you do not wash your hands after a good old soldering sesh.

If you are getting hot solder sputtering all over the place, use less solder and/or turn the heat down a little.

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I personally do not use gloves, I maybe should because once in a month I put the iron a bit too close to (read: on) my hands. Also in the field I never really see people using gloves, they might be less clumsier than me, or just accepted the monthly skin burns like me.

Keep in mind that tiny diodes and low watt resistors are, if you have big hands, already hard to grab from a table without gloves. But if you are going for a glove-ical future, get nice welding gloves. The last thing you want is melted lead and melted gloves on your hands, and those gloves seem pretty comfy too.

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    \$\begingroup\$ That's what tweezers are for... \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Apr 3 '19 at 13:48
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Try using a small vise as a third hand to hold your work.

You don't state the exact circumstances under which you are having trouble.

Molten solder is freakin' hot 700F to 800F - you can't touch it. Protective gloves will only make handling stuff more difficult. Using a decent pair of needle-nose pliers will keep your fingers further from the really hot stuff.

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No gloves at all. As others said, you loose too much dexterity.

You can use a PCB holder (the one in the picture is the one I have, made by Weller) but eventually You'll get used to hot components and you'll learn to pay attention to the welder tip.

enter image description here

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I do not wear gloves. Soldering tip is placed on junction to be soldered, wait a second or two for the joint to heat, solder is applied, iron is removed, joint is allowed. No fingers on anything, no solder splashed around. Larger components with more mass will need a little more heating time (such as screw terminals). Large parts like that on a Gnd plane on a PCB may need 4-5 seconds of heating time before the solder will flow correctly.

I use 0.025" diameter 63/37 rosin core solder that is small and melts very quick.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/mg-chemicals/4884-454G/473-1156-ND/2177378

I buy it in 1 pound rolls, several at a time, we do a lot of thru hole soldering.

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