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This may be a stupid question, so please bear with me.

I have a fuse block with #8-32 and #10-32 screw terminals. What size loop connectors would I order for those, for proper fit? The loop connectors are usually listed in fractions of inch. How do you convert #8 and #10 to loop connector sizes?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Here you go, buddy. This gives you the defined min and max sizes, in inches, of standard ANSI screws. \$\endgroup\$
    – user39962
    Commented May 4, 2015 at 4:36

3 Answers 3

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The search term you need is "tap drill sizes". Look for clearance drill sizes in a table.

There will usually be close fit and free fit sizes, which will give you a range of sizes for the ID of your ring terminal.

#8 might be 0.1695/0.1770"

#10 might be 0.1960/0.2010"

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you. So looking at the #10 for example, would come out to a #9 drill, and the closest connector size to a #9 drill size would be 13/64 or thereabouts (rounded up). Did I get it right? \$\endgroup\$
    – Will I Am
    Commented May 4, 2015 at 2:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, that should be perfect. \$\endgroup\$ Commented May 4, 2015 at 2:53
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If you are talking about crimp terminals, the ring terminals I've used are specified in terms of screw size, so you want terminals to fit #8 and #10 screws (two different sizes).

They also accept different wire size ranges. Terminals with yellow insulation are for #10 or #12 wire, blue for #14 and #16, and red for #18 - 22.

So, if you are using #14 wire, and want to terminate it on a #8-32 screw, you need a blue ring terminal for #8 screw.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Is there a chart of the colors? My #10 terminals will receive 4 gauge, while the #8 will receive less, maybe 12 or 14 gauge. \$\endgroup\$
    – Will I Am
    Commented May 4, 2015 at 16:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ The common wire size vs insulation colour coding is as I listed. Lugs for wire larger than #10 are usually uninsulated, and often have the wire size marked. I don't think I'd like to put a #4 wire on a #10 screw - I'd prefer to use a 1/4" or larger bolt. \$\endgroup\$ Commented May 4, 2015 at 16:26
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Take the number of the screw (#10, for example), multiply it by 13, and add 60 to the result. This will give you the diameter of the screw in thousandths of an inch. Example: #10 screw: 10 x 13 = 130 + 60 = 190, therefore the diameter of the screw is .190", or slightly over 3/16".

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