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I am building a simple circuit that will use a J-K flip flop to enable me to use a momentary switch as a toggle.

enter image description here

The circuit diagram states that a 4027N should be used.

My local supplier has a 4027 in stock.

This is a really basic question I'm sure, but is this the same thing? What does that trailing N in the name mean?

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The alternative will be fine.

The trailing letters tend to be manufacturer specific, usually identifying the package (e.g. SOIC, DIP, etc.) or other properties like being lead free, or industrial/automotive/military temperature ranges, etc.

An example is the NXP version of the 4027. They have two:

  • HEF4027BP
  • HEF4027BT

For them, the 'P' one is the DIP package and the 'T' one is the SOIC package. But according to one of their other datasheets (granted for a different part), they use 'N' to signify a DIP package in America. This is probably where the 'N' comes from in that schematic.

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You don't think there's any issue here with switch bounce? If the switch does bounce, the clock input may see multiple 0->1 rising edge transitions for a single press of the switch, toggling the output multiple times.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Recommendations for a switch debouncing circuit welcome, Dean. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard Ev May 16 '15 at 16:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ From what I remember Schmitt trigger circuit is often used - or a logic gate which has a schmitt input. And a capacitor is included to remove any spikes caused by the switch. Implementations can also be done with SR latches. Here's a couple of links for you. all-electric.com/schematic/debounce.htm \$\endgroup\$ – Dean May 17 '15 at 19:07
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From what I remember Schmitt trigger circuit is often used - or a logic gate which has a schmitt input. And a capacitor is included to remove any spikes caused by the switch.

Implementations can also be done with SR latches.

Here's a couple of links for you.

http://www.all-electric.com/schematic/debounce.htm

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CB0QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eng.utah.edu%2F~cs5780%2Fdebouncing.pdf&ei=FOFYVe2cK4TXU5iMgLAN&usg=AFQjCNEppSfSIc313thRdgXgoWieieFjFw

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