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I am a student of electronics and instrumentation engineering and have a course of electromagnetic field theory in our semester. Though haven't gone so deep in subject but have some primary idea about the subject. I just want to ask where is field theory necessary and what should be the best approach to read the subject? I am not an expert in the subject and having many difficulties to understand it. Can anyone tell me which points are necessary and which aren't?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the stack. Are you talking classical field theory or quantum field theory or is it the mathematics of fields? Better to ask a specific question about a specific problem you are having rather than a general 'I don't understand field theory what should I know ' which is likely to get closed as it is too broad and answers will be opinion based. As we are unfamiliar with your syllabus and the level required perhaps the best person to ask is your lecturer. \$\endgroup\$ May 22, 2015 at 11:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for guiding me. I am talking about classical field theory includes electrostatics magnetostatics and electromagnetic waves. In short which is also called electromagnetic field theory. \$\endgroup\$
    – Demietra95
    May 22, 2015 at 11:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ As for the topic question - electricity, and hence EE are FULLY built on top of field theory. All of the implications that are considered by some as EE, like Ohm law e.t.c. are just implications. Models built after performing some assumptions and simplifications. Of course, what you refer by field theory (btw, what is it? Maxwell equations?), is a model as well of some lower level stuff.. \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    May 22, 2015 at 12:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Olin Opinion based ? Maxwell would be spinning in his grave (and radiating appropriate frequency Hertzian waves, no doubt) \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Jun 9, 2015 at 9:08

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Demietra95,

It all depends on what field of electrical engineering you work, but it would be the best to learn all of that you said that you learning on course. Never enough knowledge. You'll need something of that in some of your future projects, and the best way to understand that theory and a lots of calculations and tasks is while working on some projects. So don't worry just do your best, learn as much as you can, and your life will be so much easier later. Be persistent and don't give up :)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I was a student also, not much time ago, and I understand your confusion :) \$\endgroup\$
    – user76920
    May 22, 2015 at 13:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sir /mam @Master Yoda can you tell me what should be the best book to learn this subject from the basic to the advance level ? I want to understand the subject properly and gain some knowledge from this. \$\endgroup\$
    – Demietra95
    May 22, 2015 at 14:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Almost every book is good book, but I recommend you to attend to some online video courses like this one ocw.mit.edu/resources/… also look there google.rs/… \$\endgroup\$
    – user76920
    May 22, 2015 at 14:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ I recommend Electromagnetic Fields by Wangsness. Takes you from vector calculus all the way up to electromagnetic radiation via maxwells equations. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 18, 2016 at 10:50

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