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I have an IC, that has 5 visible bonds. The entire IC is covered with some sort of semi transparent bonding glue. I want to identify the IC and were thinking to remove the glue somehow. What chemical compound can be safetly used without damaging the IC or potentially erasing any markers from it?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I am not sure how you are going to identify it after that? By looking at the traces and transistors under a microscope? \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH May 28 '15 at 13:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Some ICs have the manufacturer's logo etched on, or other identifying features... Not sure if you have ever seen a bare IC before, or know how they make them?! \$\endgroup\$ – KingsInnerSoul May 28 '15 at 14:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ rarely the bare die contains any identification marks. \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH May 28 '15 at 14:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ You are pretty much wrong! I can only assume you have not worked with, or seen many bare die. \$\endgroup\$ – KingsInnerSoul May 28 '15 at 14:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ only a couple of dozen, and maybe once or twice I saw a manufacturer logo. Might be more common for certain kinds of chips than for others. I usually looked into flatpacks that didn't have any (useful) markings. \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH May 28 '15 at 14:21
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Usually heated fuming nitric or sulfuric acid is used to remove epoxy encapsulant. A properly passivated chip won't be damaged by this, and you'll still be able to read any text that is visible with a microscope.

That's assuming it's epoxy. If the material is flexible (such as silicone rubber used in some markets) you might need a different set of chemicals.

I suggest you find a vendor who does this as a service.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Would you know what is the other chemical compound used for flexible stuff? \$\endgroup\$ – KingsInnerSoul May 28 '15 at 14:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ Check out patent U.S.4089704 A \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany May 28 '15 at 14:43

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