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I need to replace an SMD capacitor on a board. The printing on it says

F1 560 2.5z

I have googled intensely but have been unable to find information on how to read such a codes.

I need to find out its capacitance and voltage. I think it could be 560uf, but I need to be sure of that and still have to find out the volatage rating.

Also would it be ok to replace an SMD electrolytic capacitor with a standard through-hole electrolytic one of the same capacitance and voltage rating?

I am adding picture of the relavant part below:

Inside the red square is the capacitor I need help with Inside the red square is the capacitor I need help with

Inside the red reactangle on top there are two other SMD capactor presumably from the same manufacturer. I posted these as well in the hope it may help to find out the manufacturer of the cap I need to replace. Inside the red reactangle on top there are two other SMD capactor presumably from the same manufacturer. I posted these as well in the hope it may help to find out the manufacturer of the cap I need to replace.

Can somebody please help me?

Thanks.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Are there any indications of manufacturer? Can you post a photo? \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Johnson Jun 8 '15 at 12:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok give me few minutes. \$\endgroup\$ – geraldCelente Jun 8 '15 at 12:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NickJohnson Please find the requested pictures above. Thank you for your time. I really appreciate it! \$\endgroup\$ – geraldCelente Jun 8 '15 at 14:03
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I think you have a (warning, PDF) Lelon series VEZ 560µF, 2.5Volt VEZ is a low ESR series.

The markings are as follows:

  1. F1 - Date code. I couldn't find a key for the date code.
  2. 560 - 560µF
  3. 2.5Z - 2.5Volts, Z is the short code for the VEZ series.

enter image description here

Here is a list of PDFs for the various Lelon capacitor series.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok thanks. I could have never have found out this piece of info myself! From my understand LOW ESR caps are low energy, and are used in energy efficiecy settings. Apart from battey duration, does it matter if I discard this feature and use just a standard CAP? Is it ok to replace a 560uF with a 470uF cap? \$\endgroup\$ – geraldCelente Jun 8 '15 at 15:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ That looks to be in a switching power supply of some kind (I see a couple of inductors in the area of the Z-Series parts) so you may need to stick to with low equivalent series resistance (ESR) parts. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Jun 8 '15 at 15:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ @geraldCelente - no, you must use the ESR caps. Apparently, the voltage converter used to feed the ICs which are being used produces a great deal of ripple. If you do not use low-ESR caps they will dissipate more heat, and since the manufacturer decided that he HAD to use low-ESR caps (rather than the cheaper alternatives), you should assume that the extra heat will cause reliability problems. They also won't work as well at suppressing ripple. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Jun 8 '15 at 15:52
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To know what the markings mean for certain, you need to look in the manufacturers datasheet. F1 may be a package code, 560 maybe the capacitance in µF, and 2.5z could be lots of things, like the series name or whatever. The only way to know for sure is to read the datasheet.

Yes, you can replace a SMD capacitor with a thru hole of the same rating as long as you can mechanically do it and the decreased ruggedness is acceptable to you. The thru hole part kludged onto SMD pads will put a lot of stress on those pads and the solder. Unless this is a one-off test on a lab bench, it is probably a good idea to glob hot glue around the area as additional mechanical support to keep the stress off the solder joint.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Well I understand that. The problem is finding out the capacitor manufacture in order to get the datasheet. \$\endgroup\$ – geraldCelente Jun 8 '15 at 14:02
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Is Nippon Chemicon PXF Series link datasheet: http://www.chemi-con.co.jp/e/catalog/pdf/al-e/al-sepa-e/002-cp/al-pxf-e-150701.pdf

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