0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm sort of new to Altium, so any kind of detailed help would be very welcome... I need to create a PCB in altium that has copper all around with small plastic channels surrounding the tracks. Is it possible to create such thing (as described in the picture)? Do I have to create some sort of polygon around it?

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ That looks like a standard copper pour (often used for a ground plane). Most PCB editors generate these using a polygon. In the photo there are a number of "islands" where orphaned areas are not connected to the main pour. This might not be the default option. \$\endgroup\$
    – David
    Jun 27, 2015 at 22:28
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ However that picture does look like it was made using a PCB router (or CNC) rather than a standard chemical process. \$\endgroup\$
    – David
    Jun 27, 2015 at 22:29

1 Answer 1

3
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, you use a polygon copper pour (put the polygon on a copper layer) and connect the pour to the desired net if you want to use it for connectivity (it's generally bad form to leave copper floating without a good reason).

Copper pours can be a bit inconvenient to work with while you are manually routing a board so you can 'shelve' the polygons while you are working on other things. Today's computers are not fast enough to repour in real time, so you need to repour the polygon whenever changes are made that affect the polygon (such as moving a via).

As David said, your image looks like a milled PCB that would likely have been created by post-processing the Gerber output files to create tool paths.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much for your answer, but one more question if I may - I print my own circuits and do the chemical process myself... I tried drawing a polygon in Altium but it didn't print it (I usually print the Gerber). Is there any detailed tutorial I could follow? \$\endgroup\$ Jun 28, 2015 at 7:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Perhaps it wasn't on the correct layer. It should print if it's on the right layer and not 'shelved', and you should be able to see it along with the traces on the layer in question in single layer mode (Ctrl-S). Tutorial here \$\endgroup\$ Jun 28, 2015 at 7:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.