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So I am making an audio switch, and I need a switch that takes 3 dual inputs and outputs one of them, or vice versa, taking one dual input and outputting it to one of three outputs. It needs to be an on-on-on switch. I think it is different from a DPDT, a 3PDT and a 4PDT. I have know idea what to search for! Here are the details below, a '•' means a contact and the lines just mean it connects one to another:

OFF

1• •  
2• •
3• •
4• •

POSITION 1- Connections: 1a&2a, 1b& 2b

1• •
 | |
2• •
3• •
4• •

POSITION 2- Connections: 3a&2a, 3b& 2b

1• •
2• •
 | |
3• •
4• •

POSITION 3- Connections: 4a&2a, 4b& 2b

1• •
2• •
  \ \
3•|•| 
  / /
4• •

If someone could give me a name of a switch that would be great!

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I think you want a two pole three (or four) position (2P3T) switch, although your "drawings" are confusing, and appear, to me, to disagree with your description.

Perhaps MRX204A, as shown on http://www.nkkswitches.com/pdf/MRpowerLevel.pdf (Digikey MRX204-A - NKK Switches 360-2378-ND) would suit?

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You could delegate the job to an analogue multiplexer. The CD4052 has two parallel four-to-one analogue switches built in, and two logic-level inputs that determine which of the four inputs is connected to the output - and the signals can go either way. It's essentially a DP4T switch except you get to control it digitally with a SP4T , which it probably more commonly available, and a bit less bulky. For that matter, you could control it with anything that can provide a logic 0 or 1.

From your diagram, pin 2 appears to be the common pin so they would be X and Y on the diagram below for 2a and 2b, respectively. You then use X0...2 and Y0..2 as the remaining connections, with X3 and X4 left unconnected for your off state.

CD4052 pinout

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