1
\$\begingroup\$

Can you produce max waves, adding them, creating massive spikes like it showed in this video with water, but with multi antennas. Can you do this with electromagnetic wave in air with some complex mathematics, if you can, how can you measure it? I am only interested, if you can create massive wave, spike shown in minute 2:50-3:10 and if you can capture it? Can you create this massive "spike" anywhere in space? Is this even possible, does anyone know if someone already done this?

https://youtu.be/ewIr4lO4408?t=2m50s

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Radio stations routinely use antenna arrays to point their output beams in one direction or another. The ability to create a single localized "spike", though, probably depends on having a large number of antennas spread over a large area, so might not be economical for many applications. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Aug 3 '15 at 20:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ As @the photon says; Yes it is possible to have electromagnetic waves interfere with each other and produce a "spike". Any energy propagating as a wave can do that. Light Diffraction en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction is a good example of this. \$\endgroup\$ – BenG Aug 3 '15 at 22:47
2
\$\begingroup\$

The idea you are referring to is know as beam forming. Some high end WiFi routers have been using it for several years now. The idea is by transmitting the same signal from multiple antennas (usually 4) and imposing different delays on 3 of them the signal forms paths of interference. Some being destructive and some being constructive. By pointing a channel of constructive interference in the direction of a client (a laptop for example) the signal strength is boosted in that direction.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.