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I have recently read in a book that in 2010,junction-less transistors were developed.

I can't understand how a junction-less transistor can be used to amplify current or voltage with having any junction in it or rather how does it work?

Can someone explain me it's working?

I read about the construction in google's links, but the working given there doesn't help me a lot.

Courtesy: SlideShare.net

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    \$\begingroup\$ It's also called a "field-effect transistor" or FET. You'll probably get more hits by searching for those terms. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Aug 8 '15 at 12:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ There is an IEEE paper which discusses these here: ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?arnumber=6218561 - it doesn't appear to require you to log in unlike most papers from ieeexplore, or at least it just loaded the paper for me. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Aug 8 '15 at 14:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ They are also known as JTL FETs. If you google that, there are a few links come up including a full PhD thesis on how they work. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Aug 8 '15 at 14:28
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MOSFET as pictured was invented well before 2000, perhaps you mean MESFET , which is basically a JFET with the junction being instead a Schottky barrier

see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MESFET that page says 2009 on the earliest reference.

JFETs and MESFETs work on the same principle the gate terminal can repel the charge carriers electrostatically out of the channel, when the channel is starved of charge carriers the device can't pass much current and behaves as a high resistance (or an insulator), it it has many it behaves as a low resistance.

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    \$\begingroup\$ The pictured image isn't a traditional MOSFET. They have have either an n-doped channel with p-doped drain and source (N channel) or a p-doped channel with an n-doped drain and source (P Channel) \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Aug 8 '15 at 14:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, MESFETs are completely different as they don't have a gate oxide, they use a schottky diode (metal-semi junction) instead. Hence the name Metal-Semiconductor (MES) FET rather than Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) FET. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Aug 8 '15 at 14:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ yeah. the picture does not match the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Nov 4 '15 at 1:38

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