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My office has a few of these (http://www.hammondmfg.com/182.htm)

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and I came across a circuit which are driving these up to 5KHz. To my knowledge, the circuit worked and has been used in the past for a few years. I can't speak with the original designer because they aren't with the company anymore. I'm curious of the possible implications (if any) of running a transformer at frequencies much higher than what was specified.

Now the data sheet says that the it's intended for 50/60Hz. I understand the problems that can arise when you run a transformer below its rated frequency but I've not come across anything that really talks about what happens if you run it faster.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I think the only consequence is that the transformer is now mostly dead weight (i.e. the core is larger than it needs to be). \$\endgroup\$ Aug 14, 2015 at 0:48

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I assume that the applied voltage must be somewhere near the 50/60 Hz rated voltage. That means that the maximum flux density Bmax will be a lot less than rated. This is a toroid transformer that is described as "low loss." The leakage inductance should be low because of the toroid construction.

Here are some notes re: losses:

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This article covers the issues at both lower and higher frequencies. Increased eddy losses, potentially greater resistance than the ideal case, and the same limit on power rating are the main concerns spelled out in the article.

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