2
\$\begingroup\$

I was reading a scientific paper, and the authors sometimes use the term "transmit power" and sometimes "transmission power".

Is there a difference in terms of correct English usage?

Examples:

we propose to adjust the transmission power used for...

.

we propose to use transmit power control in order to...

.

a higher transmit power of a sender should not be...

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is the paper written by a native english speaker? Doesn't seem like it. It's a grammatical error. \$\endgroup\$ – KyranF Aug 17 '15 at 18:50
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it does not relate to the design of electronics or similar, rather it belongs in the English Stack Exchange or even a question for EE.SE Chat. \$\endgroup\$ – KyranF Aug 17 '15 at 18:51
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ Clarification of design terms is on topic.... \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Aug 17 '15 at 19:11
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ I agree with @Passerby. Although it is a linguistic question, it is deeply related with EE theory. Whether or not some seemingly incorrect terminology is wrong or not is not likely to be answered correctly by non-technical people. Just an example: the expression "to sort the tree" is something which probably has no sense for someone who doesn't know not only what a tree means in computer science, but what a sort operation on a tree is. I agree with KyranF on the fact that probably it is incorrect if it is written by a non-native speaker, but without seeing more context, it is difficult to say. \$\endgroup\$ – Lorenzo Donati supports Monica Aug 17 '15 at 19:37
4
\$\begingroup\$

The technical usage of these terms in these limited samples/context seems correct. The terms are interchangeable. Their grammatical usage might be a bit odd, but again the context is limited. Seems like someone trying too hard to not use the same words over and over again. A student paper perhaps. Doesn't change the meaning in any case.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Agreed, they are still the same meaning, just the use of them as a noun or verb ("to transmit" is a verb, "transmission power" is a noun/thing being referred to) seems odd \$\endgroup\$ – KyranF Aug 17 '15 at 21:14
1
\$\begingroup\$

I would write:

We propose to adjust the transmitted power used for ...

We propose to use power transmission control for ...

A sender's higher power transmission should not be ...

We propose to transmit power to customers located ...

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

I think context may be mandatory to know the real answer, but it may be that they are using the noun form, "transmission," when referring to the transmission mid-air, and the verb form, "transmit," when referring to the action of transmitting from the point of view of the individual doing the transmitting.

I've also seen situations where there is a difference between your intended values and the actual measured values, especially with antennas. I don't see enough context to be sure, but if you see knockdown factors appearing in their equations, that may be the distinction they are drawing.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.