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I am challenged with a task of detecting a human from behind the glass. Could you please suggest what kind of sensor will be a good fit for the job?

A sensor can only be mounted on the inside of the glass panel approximately 1 meter above the head or at the knee level.

How do I detect if there is anyone standing in the immediate proximity from the glass panel on the other side?

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closed as too broad by PeterJ, Brian Carlton, Null, Dave Tweed Sep 5 '15 at 11:08

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Instead of dumping your challenge to let others do your challenge, have you already some ideas to solve this? \$\endgroup\$ – Rick van Loo Sep 5 '15 at 3:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ "Obviously" a camera and something running OpenCV (or SimpleCV) in some form or another. \$\endgroup\$ – vicatcu Sep 5 '15 at 4:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ The only thing I can think of is a camera. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Sep 5 '15 at 4:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is a valid, on-topic question, so what's the rationale for wanting to close it? \$\endgroup\$ – EM Fields Sep 5 '15 at 7:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ The most obvious answer (PIR sensor) won't work since most glass and IR-transparent plastic is opaque to far IR (10um-ish). Second most obvious- camera and software- might work- what if the human is wearing a Dalek (or bear) costume, for example? \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Sep 5 '15 at 10:24
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If the glass is IR transparent and the only moving thing on the other side of the glass is warm-blooded, you could use a passive infrared (PIR) motion detector.

If the glass isn't IR transparent (or even if it is) you could use an LDR configured to detect fast-ish changes in illumination from the other side of the glass.

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Possibly by change in capacitance as the human gets close. Coat the inside of the window in conductive transparent "paint" and use a high frequency oscillator and look for a change in current taken by the "coating" as the human approaches. It's just a possibility to try out using a sheet of tin foil to see if it works.

If it works then a bear would also trigger a detect and because you live in Canada this may invalidate the idea.

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