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I believe this is a 33pF ± 5% 100v SMD Electrolytic Capacitor, but I'm unsure because of the value of the second line:

capacitor to which I'm having trouble identifying

Am I reading it wrong? And where could I find such a replacement capacitor?

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    \$\begingroup\$ More likley 33 uF. Electrolytic capacitors are normally over 1 uF, as the construction allows large values in a smaller volume than other technologies. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Sep 6 '15 at 17:15
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Second line - capacitance in uF, third line - voltage. So, 33 uF 100V. Not sure about 1st line, it must be series name or code which describes structure type.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your answer. When researching earlier, I found a site that gave some capacitor codes, which is what led me to believe the first line indicated 33pF ± 5%. However the availability of the capacitor recommended, and its common use in a power supply for a monitor, makes me confident you're correct. \$\endgroup\$ – B. Hutchkins Sep 6 '15 at 19:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ "330" follows the convention for resistors, such that it's 33 with a multiplier of (10^0). 331 would be 330uF, 332 would be 3300uF, etc. You're right that, sight unseen, you'd think it's 33pf. But being a large electrolytic cap, we know from experience that it's 33uF. \$\endgroup\$ – gbarry Sep 6 '15 at 20:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @gbarry is correct. Sometimes (specifically in the case of OSCON caps farnell.com/datasheets/1734354.pdf) the first line is the case size, but that's not the case here (pun intended). \$\endgroup\$ – Fizz Sep 7 '15 at 5:52

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