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The setup is as followed

Signal generator (50 Ohm) -> coax cable (50 Ohm) half wave length-> short circuit

Of course I didn't do this because I thought this might blow up something, it's just a thought experiment.

So would the reflected wave being completely absorbed by the internal resistance?

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As your cable is a half wavelength long (for a specific fundamental frequency and its harmonics) and the end is short circuited, then essentially the input end of the cable would also be effectively a short circuit, with a standing wave set up in the cable.

What this means is that all of the power from the signal generator would be dissipated in its internal resistance, just like if you shorted out a power supply.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Would the 1/2wavelength cable behaves similar to a 'short' transmission line? \$\endgroup\$ – Nhân Lê Sep 11 '15 at 0:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ As @Tom Carpenter said, the short circuit at the antenna end of the line would look like a short circuit at the transmitter end. A half wavelength on the Smith Chart is one complete circle so any impedance at the antenna will be experienced a half wavelength away towards transmitter. A half wavelength is not 'short' in this context. \$\endgroup\$ – Chu Sep 11 '15 at 11:03

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