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Well I know that it fuse will pass more 50ma in my multimeter but I want to know that will it make some change in my calibration of multimeter?

can more 50ma current can damage my meter?

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closed as off-topic by Leon Heller, Ricardo, Null, PeterJ, Michael Karas Sep 20 '15 at 4:23

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Leon Heller, Ricardo, Null, PeterJ, Michael Karas
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes it can. Use proper parts. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Sep 18 '15 at 17:19
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I'll answer a question you did not ask 1st: "is it dangerous to use a different fuse in my meter than the one specified by the manufacturer?". The answer for that question is: YES! Always use the recommended fuse type. Other fuses might fail to supply protection against damage to your device or even worse they might fail in protecting the user!

As for calibration, I find it hard to believe it would affect anything.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I find it hard to belive that a 50ma difference in current rating would have any noticable impact on user safety. Wrong type of fuse is more likely to be hazardous (and cheap multimeters are hazardous to use in high current environments even when fitted with the specified fuse). \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Green Jan 22 '16 at 2:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @PeterGreen Generally I agree with you, but you need to adapt your answer to who is asking the question. If someone asks this question he is probably better off finding an exact replacement for everyone's benefit. \$\endgroup\$ – user34920 Mar 16 '16 at 16:50
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High accurate instruments have special fuses, you can't miss the difference and those fuses are expensive as well. http://www.amazon.com/DMM-11A-Fluke-Digital-multimeter-replacement/dp/B007QU1TQQ
If you own a cheap multimeter, then probably you can put a standard dimension fuse. Even if so, check the characteristics of the fuse, F means fast, FF means very fast.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The reason for special fuses in high end multimeters is to make the meters safe for use on high current circuits, nothing to do with accuracy (indeed the fuses with high safety ratings often result in undesirablly high burden voltages for ELV work). \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Green Jan 22 '16 at 2:09

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