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I have a multimeter with maximum value of 200uF. I want to measure a capacitor which is 420V 330µF. Can it be understood whether the capacitor works or does not (its working condition) even that measurement is not so precise?

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Get any old 100uF capacitor and measure it. OK so far? Place it in series with the 330uF and measure the series capacitance.

If the original reading was 100 uF and the 2nd reading was 76.74 uF then you can perfectly asssume that your 330 uF is exactly 330 uF.

Capacitors in parallel add like resistors in series but capacitors in series add like this: -

\$C_{TOTAL} = \dfrac{1}{\dfrac{1}{C_1}+\dfrac{1}{C_2}}\$

I.e. just like resistors in parallel.

Another test is to measure the leakage current and maybe you can measure the leakage resistance with your meter. This will give you some idea as to whether the cap is in good shape. If your capacitance is about right and the leakage resistance is over 1Mohm then there's a good chance it will be OK but there's no real substitute for trying it out.

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Your 'max value' seems to me like it's probably just one of the range selections on your meter. Depending on your meters resolution, you can measure higher capacitance.

My meters highest range selection is 200uF as well, but my resolution is 399.9 at that range. So, theoretically I can measure capacitors up to a value of 399.9uF.

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