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Is it correct to say that ADC is done in two steps: 1-Sample and Hold 2- Quantization

or it should be done in two steps: 1-Sample and Hold 2- Encoding ?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ There isn't always just one word for something. Both quantization and encoding seem like reasonable words for the same process, to me. \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Oct 12 '15 at 1:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ I just saw a course slide and it was written that ADC is done in two steps: 1-Sample and hold 2- quantization and encoding \$\endgroup\$
    – Jack
    Oct 12 '15 at 1:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Okay, then they're splitting it up into three steps, but the last two are in some way not as separate as those two are from the first one. What's the problem with that? \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Oct 12 '15 at 1:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am writing a project report: so if I go with ADC is done in two steps: 1-Sample and Hold 2- Quantization. I am writing a correct statement? \$\endgroup\$
    – Jack
    Oct 12 '15 at 1:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your statement is correct. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 12 '15 at 1:23
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You definitely need sample+hold and quantization in there. Encoding is going to be a bit dependent on what type of ADC you have. A successive approximation or pipeline ADC usually quantize one bit at a time, and no extra encoding is required after that. However, other types of converters do need some extra processing. For example, flash ADCs need to convert the outputs of 2^n comparators into a single n-bit number. This would probably be best described as encoding. Delta-sigma ADCs also have to do some sort of postprocessing/filtering to convert a high speed 1-bit wide stream into slower-paced samples of greater bit depth (i.e. 16 bits). However, this would more likely be called 'decimation' or 'sample rate conversion' than encoding.

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