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I want to buy accessories for soldering but was curious about electrical wire testing hooks:

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What are they for? For picking hard to access little wires? How do i work with them?

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    \$\begingroup\$ They're basically alligator clips. But awesome. \$\endgroup\$ – Connor Wolf Sep 15 '11 at 22:24
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If you remove the cap you'll have a metal dingus where you can solder a wire to. You then have a test lead which can hook onto wires, IC pins, resistor leads, you name it. Use it to make signal or power connections or as measuring leads to a DMM.

They allow for finer work than alligator clips, which serve the same function:

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It's a good idea to have some test leads within reach, and to have them in different colors, so that you can tell the signals apart easily when the wiring becomes spaghetti-like; for instance use black for ground and red for your positive power supply.

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These hook type test leads can be very useful. They complement, not replace, other types of temporary connections like alligator clips. Alligator clips clamp on to something. Clip leads hook onto something. The latter can, for example, hook onto a single leg of a DIP package, which is something an alligator clip can't do.

You should have a bag of each kind of test lead. Companies like Jameco sell assortments of test leads. Get maybe a half dozen or whatever one package is of both alligator clips and the hook-type clip leads.

I also keep bare alligator clips around that have no wire connected to them. These are for making up custom jigs. You could also get more alligator test leads, then cut one in half to get two incommitted clips when you need to make your own cable.

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    \$\begingroup\$ They're also handy for hooking onto the legs of power transistors and diodes. \$\endgroup\$ – Adam Lawrence Sep 15 '11 at 14:00

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