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Thinking to start selling my widget and pondering these questions..

I have understood that there's no labeling needed for "A digital device used exclusively as industrial, commercial, or medical test equipment".

However, leaving FCC label/mark out and not saying anything about that on the product, would look like FCC rules were not even considered.

In this case is it customary to say in the label "FCC exempted test equipment" or just "Test equipment", or something like that?

Thanks...

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This FCC document may be helpful, particular from page 5 onward. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Nov 4 '15 at 16:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also be aware that outside the US, there are specific requirements for testing ISM equipment ... for example, CISPR 11 in Europe. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Nov 4 '15 at 19:18
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I believe that exemption only applies to devices that are classified as "unintentional radiators." You also should be aware that:

The operator of the exempted device shall be required to stop operating the device upon a finding by the Commission or its representative that the device is causing harmful interference. Operation shall not resume until the condition causing the harmful interference has been corrected. Although not mandatory, it is strongly recommended that the manufacturer of an exempted device endeavor to have the device meet the specific technical standards in this part.

In order to reassure the buyer that they are not at risk of being ordered to stop using the equipment, it would be prudent to test and mark the device or provide a statement about compliance.

Reference

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I didn't ask that. I asked how to label (or not label) it when not tested. \$\endgroup\$ – tipo1000 Nov 4 '15 at 17:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @tipo1000 The reality is your customer doesn't care. \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Young Nov 4 '15 at 17:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Practically no consumers understand or care. Some industrial, commercial and medical customers may care. I have experience with industrial equipment. We found it necessary to provide a written response when the question was asked. If it is not tested, you would be inviting questions if you marked the device. If questions are asked, you will likely find that "it has not been tested because it is exempt" is not a response that you customer will accept. \$\endgroup\$ – Charles Cowie Nov 4 '15 at 17:53

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