1
\$\begingroup\$

If a positive gate pulse is given to a forward biased thyristor, it gets turned on. What will happen when a negative gate pulse is given to a reverse biased thyristor ?

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Nothing... Well unless it is really really high and you get GTO like behaviour ( although the magnitude and di/dt needed to force the abnormal affect is very unlikely)

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Could you please explain the reason. \$\endgroup\$ – Ansh Kumar Nov 11 '15 at 7:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ If the negative gatepulse is high enough it essentially removes the minority carriers from the base area of the NPN stack. This current however is higher than the fwd current and more of a physical phenomenon not something likely to occurred. \$\endgroup\$ – JonRB Nov 11 '15 at 7:32
0
\$\begingroup\$

In normal operation of a Thyristor or SCR, nothing.

Excess voltages of dV/dt spike will eventually cause some kind of transient or permanent breakdown. Excess is a relative term and such operation is usually not desirable.

Triacs have conduction modes in the other quadrants.

Also see this similar question.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.