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And how would one do so?

I'm doing a programming project that requires me to propagate input signals through a circuit consisting of different types of logic gates. One of the gates I need to implement is a custom one whose truth table is:

+---------+---------+---------+--------+
| Input 1 | Input 2 | Input 3 | Output |
+---------+---------+---------+--------+
|       0 |       0 |       0 |      1 |
|       0 |       0 |       1 |      1 |
|       0 |       1 |       0 |      0 |
|       0 |       1 |       1 |      0 |
|       1 |       0 |       0 |      1 |
|       1 |       0 |       1 |      0 |
|       1 |       1 |       0 |      0 |
|       1 |       1 |       1 |      0 |
+---------+---------+---------+--------+

I'm not terribly familiar with boolean functions, digital logic, etc. so any help or insight is greatly appreciated.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If you were designing with transistors, you could make a custom gate to implement this. But if you're programming a computer to simulate it, you're stuck with the logic operations offered by your programming language. \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 19:38
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ If you feel like a bit of studying, Digital Logic Design is a useful text. You could jump to page 27 "Combinational circuit". \$\endgroup\$
    – Tut
    Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 21:42

1 Answer 1

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Yes. This could be done by inspection, or by Karnaugh maps. Although there are different methods.

The most basic method is to express the output obtained from the truth table, as a sum of products or products of sums, following the rules of Boolean algebra.
Thus, the canonical expression function described by the truth table is achieved.
By Karnaugh map, you can reduce that logic function.

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