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I recently discoverd that the current moves from the negative to postivie, but if I placed a diode from postivive to negative it will work, but if I placed it the wrong way (from negative to positive, like how the current moves) it won't work.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please read the answers from the previous question asking about the same thing. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Dec 5 '15 at 16:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Because of convention, early they were looking ions in electrolyte and they thought that's all about electrical current, but now we mostly use electron current which indeed flows from negative to positive, but never mind all the labels indicate current flow from positive to negative by convention. \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Buršič Dec 5 '15 at 16:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Another related question: Does electricity go from negative to positive or vice versa? \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Dec 5 '15 at 17:19
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All of the symbols and all of the math in electrical engineering are based on conventional current. You're talking about 'electron current' and truthfully you can completely ignore it unless you get into device physics.

It got set that way before the discovery of the electron, but because the math works out, it doesn't really matter.

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Charge flows from positive to negative. When the charge-carrying particles have negative charge (such as electrons) then the particles are moving in the opposite direction from the current, hence your confusion. If the charge-carrying particles were positive, then they would flow in the same direction as the current. The marking on your diode is correct.

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