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I am currently learning the Node voltage method to get a better know how about circuits. Let's say you have the following circuit:

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This is the workout example with all the nodes. IMHO, I disagree, I think there is one node missing and the circuit should be as follows:

enter image description here

I thought that the definition of a branch was that it could only contain 1 and only 1 element (doesn't matter what element it is). When using the first circuit the current source I5 and the resistor R4 would be in the same branch, right?

Question: Then why is this the final answer? Am I missing something? Is it wrong to add N3?

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    \$\begingroup\$ The answer you have received is correct. However, it will benefit you if you learn to place a junction marker at every junction, even if it belongs to the same node. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Dec 26 '15 at 8:08
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There is actually no point adding node "n3", because node "n0" and node "n3" are short circuited. If you try to solve it like this, there is actually no problem if you keep in mind that they have the same potential (Vno = Vn3), but there is no reason to make things complicated. Try to avoid extra unknowns :)

Also, there is no element between those two nodes, hard wiring is not considered as an element, so that is not a branch.

enter image description here

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