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I have several tiny connectors ( about 1 mm pitch, various numbers of pins per connector ) that have the letters "MXJ" molded into them. (I wish I knew what company the are from, or even better the exact part number, but I don't see any other identifying marks on the connector).

What does that "MXJ" mean?

Googling for "MXJ connector" gives me many links to a software package, and some links to pages that talk about a variety of connectors but don't actually have the word "MXJ" on the page.

Edit: My specific electronics design problem is that I have a gadget I want to interface to that uses such connectors, and I hope that I could find a matching connector rather than soldering a bunch of individual wires to the PCB. While the particular gadget I have may be extremely niche, I suspect closely related connectors are used in other gadgets used around the world for decades, making this question generally applicable to many future visitors worldwide.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ MXJ means the connector was made by Molex, in Japan. If you measure the exact pitch, then look on the Molex website for connectors with that pitch. \$\endgroup\$ – markrages Oct 14 '11 at 20:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ ok, I'll reopen. I don't think it is too localized because 1. All Molex connectors bear this mark, and 2. a Google search find several others asking the same question. Also, finding mating connectors is a pretty common (and challenging) task. \$\endgroup\$ – markrages Oct 16 '11 at 22:41
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MXJ means the connector was made by Molex, in Japan. If you measure the exact pitch, then look on the Molex website for connectors with that pitch, you can hopefully find the appropriate mating connector for your application.

I pulled this from a random Molex shrouded header datasheet: enter image description here

Notice "TRADE MARK" notation on the center-left.

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