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I want to use my 6 pin potentiometer in circuits so I want to know what all the terminals are for. I know the basic principle in the 3 pin pot. I'm completely new so please answer it in simple terms. I have attached a circuit which I want to make which pins do I use for it.

I have also checked readings with a multimeter here they are, I have numbered the pins from 1 to 6 starting from left here are the readings:

  • Pins 1-6 shows a range of 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob.

  • Pins 1-2 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms.

  • Pins 2-6 shows only 53k ohms no matter what position the knob is in.

  • Pins 3-4 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms.

  • Pins 3-5 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms.

  • Pins 4-5 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms.

I was thinking that 4-5 should only be at 53k ohms and not vary but it varies.

Here's what my pot looks like:

enter image description here

And here is the circuit I want to use it in:

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ It is most likely a dual potentiometer (one knob two independent potentiometer), but you will need to find the part number and look up the datasheet to know the pinout, you can also figure it out using a multimeter \$\endgroup\$ – crasic Jan 4 '16 at 19:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ If you have a bunch of these and can sacrifice one, it would be mildly interesting/educational to bend back the four fingers holding the metal cover on and see how they have arranged the two wipers and two elements (presumably concentric). \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jan 4 '16 at 19:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ One of these I have seen with 6 inline pins uses one element on the back of the board and one on the front. \$\endgroup\$ – 3871968 Jan 4 '16 at 20:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ +crasic I have updated the readings in the details and also attached the circuit I wish to make please tell me which pins I should connect for the circuit \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ +SpehroPefhany no unfortunately this is my only pot \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 8:01
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Edit: Check the datasheet for the TT Electronics P120KGE, it appears to be your exact potentiometer: enter image description here

This appears to be a standard dual potentiometer, commonly used as a volume control in stereo audio applications. It contains 2 individual potentiometers, connected to a common shaft, so it has 2 wipers and 4 outer terminals.

In order to determine the pinout, first you will need to find the resistance of the potentiometer, which is usually marked on the back. There should be 2 sets of 2 pins that show that resistance between them no matter what position the knob is in, and those are the outer terminals. The remaining 2 pins are the wipers. The resistance between them and the connected outer terminals will vary when the knob is turned.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok I have checked the pins with a multimeter I've numbered the pins from left starting from 1 to 6 \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ +jBot-42, Here are the readings Pins 1-6 shows a range of 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 1-2 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 2-6 show only 53k ohms no matter what position the knob is in. Pins 3-4 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 3-5 shows 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 4-5 shows a range of 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. I was thinking that 4-5 should only be at 53k ohms and not vary but it varies. \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have updated the details with the circuit I am making please tell me which pins I have to connect. \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ @KousikRajesh look at the little diagram in the bottom left of JBot-42's image. That's how its wired logically. Notice the numbers 1,2,3 and then in circles 1,2,3. Then look at the bottom right, they are marked how the pot is wired physically. That matches how you described it. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Jan 8 '16 at 8:30
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Generally, these are dual pots used in audio circuits. It is not easy to say what this does without looking through the datasheet or probing. I would suggest going through with a multimeter and ohming it out.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +mcmiln, I have got the readings here they are I have numbered the pins 1-6 starting from the left. \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Here are the readings Pins 1-6 shows a range of 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 1-2 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 2-6 show only 53k ohms no matter what position the knob is in. Pins 3-4 show 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 3-5 shows 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. Pins 4-5 shows a range of 0 ohms to 53k ohms when I turn the knob. I was thinking that 4-5 should only be at 53k ohms and not vary but it varies. \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have updated the details with the circuit I am making please tell me which pins I have to connect. \$\endgroup\$ – Kousik Rajesh Jan 8 '16 at 7:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Right off the bat, you will need to put another piece in this puzzle. If this pot goes to 53k and you need 100k, put something in series. This will mean you have a more limited range of R1 + variable R2. Other than that you need a bigger pot. Now I am not sure if this is truly a 6 pin trimming pot or a dual pot. If it is a dual pot, then you have your two pots to put in series. If not, then trimming pots works by having two endpoint pins, sometimes a center-point, and the rest are trimming pins to change the resistance curve. I hope this makes sense :) \$\endgroup\$ – mcmiln Jan 8 '16 at 17:28

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