1
\$\begingroup\$

I was asked to define what an Analog Comparator was.

After doing research, it seems to me that Analog Comparator is the same as a Voltage Comparator.

Is this true?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Yes. The reason people sometimes say "analog comparator" is to distinguish from a digital circuit which compares the digital value of two numbers. If it is clear from the context, you can just say "comparator." \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Jan 20 '16 at 2:55
3
\$\begingroup\$

In general, an analog comparator could be defined as any device intended to compare two analog quantities using analog circuit techniques. In most practical cases, the two analog quantities are voltages and the most common circuit technique is a voltage comparator. However, for example, you might need to compare two resistors for which a Wheatstone Bridge would be a suitable analog comparator device. Thus, a voltage comparator is an example of an analog comparator but not all analog comparators are voltage comparators.

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

It's almost certainly a voltage comparator. There is however a less common analog device that is also called a comparator, the current-sense comparator. Similar to the voltage comparator, but it compares current rather than voltage. As mentioned by Barry, you can also find a variety of circuits that will compare other phenomena but if you were asked about an "analog comparator" it is pretty much certain they meant a voltage comparator.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.