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Simple question, I have to make a Kelvin probe. We need to find how to make one on the internet.

However, I don't know if there are other terminology, or if I'm searching in a wrong way, but I can't seem to find how to make one.

What would be a proper way to find models for this?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you be more specific about what you are trying to achieve. If you mean kelvin measurement connection, that it is not an item in itself, it is the method of connection using 4 wires, 2 to apply current and 2 to measure voltage. \$\endgroup\$ – user1582568 Jan 22 '16 at 17:24
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If you are talking about a Kelvin test lead- they work like a pair of clamps where each side of each clamp is brought out independently, sometimes back through four coaxial cables to four BNC connectors, sometimes just to banana plugs.

enter image description here

The two sides of the clamp shown above are not connected together like they would be in an alligator clip- they are brought out to separate leads. The idea is that having separate force and sense connections allows the effects of contact resistance to be minimized.

A "Kelvin Probe" used in a Kelvin Force Probe Microscope is completely different. If this is what you are interested in you might want to look at the design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy. I believe there are some DIY projects along this line.

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What you are looking for is also known as a "four point probe" or is know as a technique called "kelvin sensing" or many variations on those phrases.

You have two probes that force the DUT (device under test) and a second pair of probes that measure the voltage across the DUT. This second set, because it is only a voltage measurement and does not support current will accurately measure the voltage across the device in the absence of IR drop on the forcing leads.

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