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I am using a lug crimper which has two rotating dies that come together to form a hex crimp. Design similar to the Greenlee K05-1GL. From a long term performance and safety perspective, How important is the alignment of the two halves in such applications (apart from cosmetics)? The attached photo shows two halves of a 35 square mm crimp that are not well-aligned by default. (There is some play in the dies so if really required I can align them with my hand before crimping.) enter image description here

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It's hard to judge from this picture, but generally you're trying to deform as much of the length of barrel of the rung terminal as possible to maximize the contact area between the wire and the barrel. That crimping tool doesn't look right to me for the ring terminal shown. The crimp area looks too small.

In any case, these are generally tight tolerance systems - only certain gauges of wires for certain terminals to assure that after crimping, there is the proper deformation and contact area. Good tools align well and give consistent crimping pressure to give consistent connections. A pull test is generally used to confirm proper crimping. Personally, I'd confirm that its the correct tool, the correct die set and then tweak the die into close alignment.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ On the crimp area - I believe with this category of tool (which is actually quite common for terminal lugs - look at the Greenlee I mentioned or search "HX-50 crimp tool" which throws up lots of generic brands) one could/would crimp twice along the barrel. I have shown the die being applied to one half of the barrel. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ram
    Jan 27 '16 at 4:21

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