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I have a project: conception and realization of a module that converts Analog to digital signals (A/D converter) and digital to analog signals (D/A converter). To communicate with this module, I will use the TCP/IP Protocol. Without using any microcontroller just ADC, DAC and TCP/IP connection so my question is: is that possible? and if it is, please give me ideas how to do that first I don't know what is the circuit and which electronics devices I need to use to concept the tcp/ip connection and second how can I connect the ADC and the DAC to this circuit. Thank you.

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closed as too broad by Daniel Grillo, nidhin, Nick Alexeev Feb 15 '16 at 8:24

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to Electronics.StackExchange! Anything is possible with discrete IC's... but since many uC's have all of these peripherals included, the question is, why not use a uC? \$\endgroup\$ – rdtsc Jan 28 '16 at 14:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ TCP/IP is a complicated protocol, and you can't (well, wouldn't want to) implement it on anything other than a CPU of some sort. That CPU could be part of a microcontroller, or it could be hidden inside an ASIC or FPGA, but it's still there. One easy way to get there is to use something like the WIZnet W5100. This chip actually contains two CPUs, one to run your application code, and one dedicated to the Ethernet interface that runs TCP/UDP/IP. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Jan 28 '16 at 14:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you are going to use TCP/IP, you will need some way of configuring the port. Will it have a DHCP client? Will it be possible to use static IP address? Using a micro will allow this to be configured more easily e.g. via a serial port. \$\endgroup\$ – user1582568 Jan 28 '16 at 14:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ there is an ethernet controller ENC28J60 i can use it for the tcp/ip communication but i don't know if i can use it without a CPU with it. PS: There is no FPGA or anything else just ADC,DAC and the TCP/IP circuit it is a graduation project from a company i don't think they will give me something unrealizable. \$\endgroup\$ – oussama Jan 28 '16 at 14:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Very difficult to talk to that device without a processor \$\endgroup\$ – Icy Jan 28 '16 at 16:20
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You can get solutions other than CPUs, but I think the cure would be worse than the disease!

The two main ways not to use CPUs are dedicated gigabit ethernet 'offload' processors, designed to interface with the on-chip busses of high end processors for use in data centres, and VHDL designs that you put onto an FPGA of your choice.

Your most practical solution is a small processor running Linux that has the ethernet hardware and an OS that knows about it, a PI, Yun, Beaglebone or something similar. If you are into unlocking commercial products running linux internally (I'm not but my colleagues at work did), then there are a few tiny white boxes with an RJ45 around that could be repurposed.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ there is an ethernet controller ENC28J60 i can use it for the tcp/ip communication but i don't know if i can use it without a CPU with it. PS: There is no FPGA or anything else just ADC,DAC and the TCP/IP circuit it is a graduation project from a company i don't think they will give me something unrealizable. \$\endgroup\$ – oussama Jan 28 '16 at 14:42
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The ENC28J60 which you reffer to in your comments is an Ethernet controller.
Just that.
It handles the MAC & PHY layers of the networking stack and nothing else.
TCP is its own layer which lives (alongside UDP, ICMP, etc) on top of the IP layer, which itself in turn lives on top of the MAC layer.

If you want "TCP/IP" in your end device then you need to implement those layers of the stack somehow, and this is usually done in some sort of programmable processor - maybe a microcontroller or maybe the CPU in your PC.

There are plenty of drop-in modules which do this for you, but you can be assured that every one of them will have some incarnation of microcontroller/processor in them.

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