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I have replaced several light fixtures with LED in my company. The 400 watt hi-bays I replaced with 95 watt LED. They work great. I replaced a set of office lights that were track halogen with 7 watt LED pot lights. They work great..... until.

The problem. We have a large turret punch press and the ram operates with a large servo motor. With every single stroke of the press the lights flicker. So if the press stroke is 100 hits per minute or only 50 hits per minute the lights will flicker accordingly. These are the only lights affected.

Is it possible to add in capacitors or a 1:1 transformer? My electrician has no answers. Power into the building is 600v and the press has its own transformer 600-480. The light circuit is 120v.

  • The LED lamps are GU10.
  • Brand is LUXWAYBGU07LEX 480LM, 120V, 60HZ, 7W, 40D, 45mA 3000K, CR190, 24314, DIMMABLE.

Thank you in advance for any solutions or ideas

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It sounds like the ram is momentarily dragging down the voltage on the 120V circuit your dimmable LEDs are on, causing them to dim. Powering the affected lights through a power conditioning UPS (uninterruptable power supply), similar to the popular APC units most of our computers/servers are plugged into, should fix this problem at a fairly low cost.

Alternatively, you could build your own AC->DC->AC converter with a large capacitor (or small battery) buffering the DC section, to accomplish the same end. This option could be less expensive and/or could give better performance/longevity if you have the desire to try it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Of the 2 alternatives the UPS is in the range of my expertise. \$\endgroup\$ – Lorne N Jan 29 '16 at 22:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would double check all of your wiring connections to ensure they are tight. Odd things can happen when things aren't as tight as they should be. That might solve your problem & it is definitely the least expensive thing you can do. If you know all the connections are good connections, then I would try a UPS (that you probably already own). Just make sure it can handle the load before you connect everything to it. hth, Best regards! \$\endgroup\$ – DIYser Jan 30 '16 at 7:28
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The fact the shop lights work fine but the office lights flicker may mean that the particular lamps used in the office are more intolerant of dips in the line.

The best way to quantify something like this is with a power quality meter, which I would expect an industrial electrician to have access to.

Failing that, and assuming the lights are on the same circuit (or at least the same transformer) in shop and office, you could randomly try different types and brands of bulbs for the office and see if it helps. @Robherc's suggestion of a UPS might cost more, but could also provide emergency lighting in the office if the power fails.

GU10 bulbs have little room for extra capacitance, and the 'dimmable' feature probably means they're intentionally sensitive to line voltage (you're dimming them when the line voltage dips).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I had wondered about the lamps and need to weigh the cost of a UPS and replacing lamps. The flicker happens whether dimmed or full on. I also setup a dimmable LED strip light on a machine for task lighting, just a plug in the wall type that works with no problem. \$\endgroup\$ – Lorne N Jan 29 '16 at 22:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ Another interesting thing. The halogen track lights were 12V and I replaces a couple of those lamps with LED lamps and there was no flickering with those. The lamp I believe is called a M16 (2 straight pins). \$\endgroup\$ – Lorne N Jan 29 '16 at 23:18
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These power outages are very short .Maybe if your lamps had a bit more DC bus capacitance you would be not having any problems .Many HID led lamps feature a meanwell driver as a selling point which I thought would be something they would want to hide .Re engineering the HID LED lamp driver circuit would solve this but it may not be practical because there are lots of lamps in very high places .A sensible approach would be a constant voltage transformer .The ones that I have seen work on the ferroresonant principle.Like a normal transformer you must get your volts (120) right and you must get your frequency right (60 Hz I suppose )

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