0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm a student studying computer engineering , I'm in love with hardware stuff /logic gates design ... etc What I studied till now is :

  • Electronics
  • IC fabrication
  • Logic circuits design (sequential , ... )
  • Error detecting & correction in logic circuits (parity check , ...) HW design
  • Computer architecture (Control unit ,execution unit ...etc ) after finishing it I was able to design a microprocessor
  • MicroProcessor (Z80 , 8086 , ..)
  • Computer Interfacing (Buses , creating cards , motherboards ..... )
  • Digital signal processing

ALL of the above courses I studied them hardly, understand them fully

I also made some projects using AVR uc ,

So what do you think the next proper step for me ??

Update 1 : I've the following software background : Software Engineering Java, C , C++ ,C# C for embedded Data structure & Algorithms Operating systems AI Image processing

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Finish your degree. Take intern-ships or summer work related to what you want to do. Choose your elective courses accordingly. This question will most likely be closed (nothing to do with electronic design). There are some historic questions here that are similar and may help you. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jon L
    Commented Oct 28, 2011 at 22:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jon Hope to know the next step in my career before it get closed \$\endgroup\$
    – xsari3x
    Commented Oct 28, 2011 at 22:09
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ you should have enough reputation to talk in the chat room - that is a great place to ask these kinds of questions. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jon L
    Commented Oct 29, 2011 at 21:14

3 Answers 3

9
\$\begingroup\$

Make something. Seriously, make something major. Imagine this: hundreds or thousands of people are exactly in your same predicament of getting out of school with lots of classes. These people are largely indistinguishable from each other. You need to do something that differentiates you from the others, and shows that you have initiative and can "hit the ground running".

I suggest designing and making something from start to finish. It should be as close to a real product as possible (without incurring lots of costs of fancy prototypes). It will probably take you 3 to 6 months to complete the project. This should also be something useful and something that you have a passion for. Don't do another me-too project.

What I don't recommend, at least initially, is going for a masters or Ph.D. People with post-doc degrees and no experience have a hard time getting jobs. These folks have the education to demand a high salary, but no practical experience to actually do the job and no job history to show that they are worth the salary they demand. In short, most employers are hesitant to hire these folks.

Once you have something other than school on your resume then you can think about furthering your education. There is also a huge chance that you'll decide to not bother.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Going straight for a Ph.D. makes it look like you want to be a professor. And honestly, expect to screw up your project. Getting it right the first time is a good goal, but not as important as getting it right as soon as you can, which usually means don't make it impossible to debug. I've seen too many people spend all their time crafting their project, they build it and turn it on... and nothing happens. And they have no idea at all where to start looking because it's all closed up (can't get to clock lines, no status LEDs or anything, no debug ports, etc.). \$\endgroup\$ Commented Oct 29, 2011 at 12:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MikeDeSimone You make some very good points! \$\endgroup\$
    – user3624
    Commented Oct 29, 2011 at 13:28
1
\$\begingroup\$

You may want to consider doing a post-graduate degree or some post-graduate degree courses in Embedded Systems Design. You can consult a lecturer who has a post-graduate degree in Embedded Systems/Computer Systems Design to discuss your options based on your qualifications, skills and interests(e.g. what type of embedded systems you're interested in designing) to help decide your best move forward. If you can, you might also want to talk to someone working in the industry that will tell you the more profitable sections of the industry, what the future of the industry looks like, and an idea of the finances needed if you are interested in starting your own business in that area. I'd advise you to make sure you have a really, really good knowledge base in Analog Electronics, since a big part of embedded system design is conditioning and processing analog signals so that they are in a form that a micro-controller can handle.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

You are going to need some programming classes in there as well, even if you are only interested in hardware. C, and C++ would be a good start.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ kindly check update \$\endgroup\$
    – xsari3x
    Commented Oct 28, 2011 at 22:08

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.