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Has anyone got an example of coating a Lilypad or some other electronics in resin to make them waterproof.

I'm wanting to make something that is really resilient -> Being lazy i want to be able to chuck it in the washing machine...hand washing is far too much effort.

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Simply searching for "resin" in Instructables provided several good results. I would recommend using Resin as well. I honestly can't think of any other way to cover a circuit board, and have it clear at the same time.

http://www.instructables.com/id/USB-casting-in-transparent-resin/

Also, if you have a need for a lot of resin, here's another good link: http://www.instructables.com/id/[Video]-Mixing-Polyester-Resin/

One last thing. Different types/amounts of sanding will result in the resin becoming foggy. If you don't want this, both links discuss how to make it clear.

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Is there a reason you want to use resin as opposed to a product made for the purpose?

Conformal coating is what we use in the electronics industry. One advantage of this is that some types of coating are made to be removable with solvents, which would allow you to modify or repair your board after it was coated.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Agreed. This is what we currently use to weatherproof our devices. The water vapour problem can still happen, but this would be more along the lines of common industry practice. \$\endgroup\$ – Kortuk Nov 16 '09 at 15:59
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I've had some luck with these two products: liquid electrical tape and polymorph pellets. They are cheap and easy to use.

The pellets can be melted with a low heat and molded directly onto the circuit board. The liquid electrical tape adds a degree of waterproofing and extra knock protection.

Washing machines can be pretty hash. Have you considered a quick release system for the main board? It might be easier than trying to make it rugged and waterproof?

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I have one very hard earned piece of advice to share.

It is very easy to make something water proof, but water vapour can ruin your world.

If you put clothes through the drier and there are rapid temperature changes you can very quickly get water to condense on your circuit board under coating. This can cause catastrophic failure that is near impossible to track down.

If you would like more information, just ask and I will go into greater detail. -Max Murphy

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This is kinda along the lines of what i'm thinking.....

This is going even further with the idea of the electronics actually working while in water!

http://www.plusplasticelectronics.com/SmartFabTextiles/Wearable-electronics-in-swimming.aspx

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I don't know how well conductive thread holds up when washed, but the resin part is certainly doable. Check out this guy who cast an entire arduino in resin. http://dotmatrixdesign.tumblr.com/

You could certainly make a smaller mold that would give you a streamlined cast Lilypad.

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I think one common solution is to make the electronics be able to unplug from the clothing, so that the only thing left on the clothing are stuff like wires or resistors or other simple things that wont be hurt by water or by rolling around inside the washing machine.

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Altho its not very strong, I have had great results with liquid latex. It can be found at costume shops and dries to a latex coating not unlike a condom.

The coolest thing about it is if you need to modify anything it is easially peeled off and reapplied with as many coats as you think you require.

In australia its about $8au for 30ml which has so far done 3 4 by 6" pcbs and 2 zombie costumes... hehe

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