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I'm working on a project that involves this LCD for a PCB.

From the drawing, I can easily tell how to connect the pins. But I am not sure how to tell from the drawing how the display should be mounted. I've heard of other displays that will have little arms or bars you can solder down. Not sure what the appropriate way would be to go for this display.

What would be the best way to attach this LCD to a PCB?

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  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ My pet peeve: It's just "LCD", not "LCD display" \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Mar 23 '16 at 18:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @pipe Yep, drives me nuts when people say that. "Liquid Crystal Display Display" is just stupid. Same with "GPS System" \$\endgroup\$ – DerStrom8 Mar 23 '16 at 20:44
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From the drawing, I don't see any mounting provision.

I expect that the display is intended to be mounted directly to the front panel of the equipment, either by clamping or by using glue. It could also snap into a suitable molded bracket on a plastic panel.

If you want to mount it to a PC board, you will probably have to design some standoff/clamp assembly yourself.

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It appears that this LCD module is meant to be attached to a PCB with very thin double-sticky tape (the D.S.T. abbreviation in the drawing) - if I am reading the drawing correctly, then it says that the thickness of the DST is only 0.05 mm. Such a tiny gap between the LCD module and the application PCB is possible because the LCD's FPC connection tail is soldered down rather than connectorized.

Now the really strange part is that some other LCD modules out there have FPC tails that are meant to go into a ZIF connector (not soldered down like this one), yet they still somehow expect the LCD to sit flat against the application PCB, even though the thinnest FPC connector I could find (Hirose FH33 series) takes up 1.20 mm of vertical space (height above PCB). I still haven't figured out how those are supposed to be mounted - but your LCD and other LCDs with solder-down tails are easy in comparison.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The connector may not have to be underneath the display. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Apr 9 '18 at 2:16
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In my previous career, I designed custom lcd modules for customers designs. One of the best ways to mount the glass to a pc board is to use a square of double stick tape, preferably with .032" of foam. The foam acts as sort of a shock absorber. If you use quality tape the lcd will never come loose. This will only work if the flex tape is long enough and flexible enough. Most all of the small, custom tn numeric/icon display modules with on board driver ics, use this technique. It works well for small hand held instruments that are likely to get dropped.

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