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I am trying to build something that will require relays and I can't figure out if this one requires 12V DC to trigger or it won't burn at 12V DC.

Absolute RLS125 12-VCD Automotive Relay SPDT 30/40A

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    \$\begingroup\$ Why are you shopping for components on Amazon? Use an electronics distributor like Digikey or Mouser and the datasheets and specs will be readily available. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 21, 2011 at 17:26

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It means it uses 12VDC to switch, and it is rated to carry up to 30 (break) / 40 (make) Amps.

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    \$\begingroup\$ There is certainly a limit which voltage can be safely applied to the terminals, but this limit might be much higher than 12V. My personal guess would be that anything under 50V is ok, but there is no datasheet available, which is a No-Go for me. You can also assume that the relay takes an input voltage of about 14V without any problems, since that is normal for a car power system if the battery is full. \$\endgroup\$
    – 0x6d64
    Nov 21, 2011 at 9:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ox6d64 - I didn't mention the maximum voltage rating for the contacts as there is no mention of it and no datasheet, so it's not worth speculating really (though you're probably right) The only thing I would assume without the datasheet is that it will work within it's limits at ~14V. It's probably worth mentioning that you can get something like this cheaper from e.g. Digikey and it will have a datasheet and be made by a well known company like Omron (I couldn't find anything much for Absolute) \$\endgroup\$
    – Oli Glaser
    Nov 21, 2011 at 10:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you need car relays get them from the junk yard. The coil should operate solidly from ~9v to ~18v as that's a realistic range of voltages an automotive 12v system might encounter. Also, as Kevin says above, don't shop for components on Amazon, or anywhere they won't give you a data sheet. \$\endgroup\$
    – John U
    Jan 9, 2013 at 9:01

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