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I want to output my circuit from -5..5v into 0..10v. My circuit generate -5..5v. What should i do to generate that signal? what analog circuit i should use? thanks

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ a diode and capacitor circuit! \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasser
    Apr 1, 2016 at 14:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Jasser could you give a detail explanation? link or schematic maybe, did i need an op amp too? \$\endgroup\$
    – rezhart
    Apr 1, 2016 at 14:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ search for clamper circuits on google... study the circuits they are easy, analyze and then use as per you requirement... \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasser
    Apr 1, 2016 at 14:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @rezhart Jasser is I believe suggesting a series capacitor with one side being the input and the other being the output. Then add a diode from ground (anode) to the output (cathode). What frequencies are we talking about here? is it a continuous waveform, or something like a data signal? Is it two discreet levels or a continuous range? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 1, 2016 at 14:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ You are basically talking about a DC level shifter then. The circuits in the answers to this question will do what you require. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 1, 2016 at 14:53

4 Answers 4

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You can do it with one op-amp and four identical resistors.

One resistor from the incoming signal to the + input on the op-amp. One resistor from the + input of the op-amp to 5V. One resistor from the - input of the op-amp to ground One resistor from the - input of the op-amp to the output of the op-amp.

The output of the op-amp is the output of your circuit.

the op-amp will need suitablly wide supply rails, +15 and -5 sould be sufficient for most op-amps.

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You need to add +5V (or subtract -5V) to/from the input voltage. Here is one possible way that uses a dual op-amp and several resistors:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

R5 should be 10K * Vref/5.0V, so if you have a precise 2.495V reference (such as a TL431) you could use 4.99K.

The op-amps require dual (+/-) supplies- OA1 has to swing to -10V at the output. There are methods that use a single op-amp as well, some of which could operate with a single supply. Look up summing amplifier.

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It kind of depends on the signal. If there's no DC component (say, an audio signal), you could get away with a simple coupling capacitor and a voltage divider. If it's a digital signal, a properly biased transistor would do. If it's somewhere in between, you'll need something more complicated.

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enter image description here

Give your input wave which you have to shift as Vin.

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