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I have the following circuit

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In this example http://www.electricaltechnology.org/2014/01/thevenins-theorem.html how are they saying that 8kOhm Resistor is in Parallel with 4KOhm Resistor.Parallel Resistances should be connected end to end like the following.. right?

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think it's pretty clear that it is not parallel.... and the statement might be wrong, but what the author is telling that the voltage at 8kohm resistor in step 2 is same as you would find out with the voltage divider rule(i.e 12V) across the 4kohm resistor since no current is flowing through 8kohm resistor. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasser Apr 8 '16 at 5:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Jasser so... these 2 resistors are not in parallel... right? \$\endgroup\$ – elecman Apr 8 '16 at 6:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes @elecman nor when you take out load as in step2 nor in the actual circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasser Apr 8 '16 at 6:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ definition of parallel circuit : a closed electrical circuit in which the current is divided into two or more paths and then returns via a common path to complete the circuit.... So as per this definition the resistors 4Kohm and (8Kohm + 5Kohm) are in parallel. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasser Apr 8 '16 at 6:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Jasser huh?.... \$\endgroup\$ – elecman Apr 8 '16 at 6:13
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Using thevenin's theorem you need to approach your circuit from the open circuit side(Across terminals A and B) rather that from the voltage source as we would normally do. So by looking at the circuit from the right to left we see that the 8k and 4k resistors are in parallel and then the 12k is in series with the parallel combination(8K + 4K). Start at point A and work your way through the circuit

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