1
\$\begingroup\$

I'm designing a system including a 3 V coin battery.

I am looking at a catalog of coin cell battery holders / sockets.

Their cost varies from 0.25 to 2+ euros (single item), so we can say there's an order of magnitude in difference (it's quite a lot!).

From the datasheets they all seem mechanically robust enough for your typical pcb application, irrespective of the price.

They also have basically the same footprint.

So why choose a more expensive one over the cheapest one?

\$\endgroup\$

2 Answers 2

3
\$\begingroup\$

A quick eyeball of coin cell holders at Mouser shows the cheap ones being the ones that are only a holddown and contact for one side - just a piece of stamped metal. The second contact is a pad on your PCB. You have to have space adjacent to the battery holder to lie the battery down and slide it into the holder.

The more expensive ones tend to be insulated and have both contacts built into an insulated shell with a hold down for the battery. You can insert the battery into these from the top - they don't need as much free space around them.

\$\endgroup\$
0
0
\$\begingroup\$

Price could vary by brand. If they are all the same brand the difference in price can reflect a number of different things such as mount type, material and also minimum order amounts. Its usually more expensive for a reason, even if you cant see it.

I would choose the cheapest one that satisfies your requirements.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are another reasons for the price difference. Is the battery rechargeable? My experience with other (non-coin size) batteries show that cheap ones may discharge much faster, may depend more on discharge current etc. Not all the properties are reflected on datasheets. \$\endgroup\$
    – Master
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 13:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.