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I am designing a 4-layer PCB on which I have a trace that carries around 40A of current. The board will need to be tested at 125C. I need a way to physically disconnect this trace when needed. What's the best way to introduce a jumper on this trace?

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    \$\begingroup\$ A fuse might work. \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Richter May 6 '16 at 0:17
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A "Molex-like" PC-mount connector. With a mating plug with jumper wire(s).

Like the connectors used for the power plugs on computer motherboards.

Use as many pins in parallel as it takes to handle 40A

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I am voting on this because of their simplicity, many sources, low cost and ease of soldering. OP just needs to be careful of heat build-up, so as not to burn the plastic. I think they are rated for 2 or 3 amps per pin. \$\endgroup\$ – user105652 May 6 '16 at 0:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ Different families have different ratings from 4-5A per pin up to 150A per pin. There are some varieties that are just metal pins in a high-temperature kapton "ribbon" which holds the pins in place during soldering. That variety should withstand high-temperature testing. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard Crowley May 6 '16 at 0:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ok. I was assuming the lower cost with higher pin count. It is what the OP is willing to pay for. The OP could use 1 with 2 pins as heavy solder cups. More expensive but much less to solder. \$\endgroup\$ – user105652 May 6 '16 at 0:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Could you use a high current smd 0R resistor? Or does it need to be 'quick action'? \$\endgroup\$ – Sam May 6 '16 at 8:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ The 0R resistor had been my first option but we need to minimize any rework the board needs (there are around 25 of these on one board). So Molex connectors are better for use, and I don't mind spending more if it makes the job easier \$\endgroup\$ – Manu May 6 '16 at 14:25

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