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Does anyone know the names of these two components labeled 50 Hz and 60 Hz, so I can find them in proteus program?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm not familiar with Proteus so I don't know exactly what it would be called or where it would be found, but for the 50Hz 'component' it looks like it may represent a solder bridge. I don't recognize the 60Hz component, but if I had to guess I'd say that it represents somewhere where you would cut the trace. This would allow you to configure the system for 50Hz or 60Hz operation. It may not be the type of component that would be in a default schematic library, you may need to create it yourself, assuming Proteus has the tools to do so. \$\endgroup\$ – A.Mac May 14 '16 at 20:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Definitely solder bridges. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 14 '16 at 20:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @A.Mac - I believe your comment is an answer. So maybe copy and paste it into "Your Answer"? \$\endgroup\$ – gbulmer May 14 '16 at 20:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Looking at the way they're arranged (and the fact that there's a logic gate in there), I'd have to agree with Ignacio, the 50Hz is most likely where you put a solder bridge and the 60Hz is most likely where you have to cut the trace for 50Hz. so it'd be in 60Hz frequency mode by default unless you cut the 60Hz track and bridge the 50Hz track. \$\endgroup\$ – Sam May 15 '16 at 0:10
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I'm not familiar with Proteus so I don't know exactly what it would be called or where it would be found, but for the 50Hz 'component' it looks like it may represent a solder bridge. I don't recognize the 60Hz component, but if I had to guess I'd say that it represents somewhere where you would cut the trace. This would allow you to configure the system for 50Hz or 60Hz operation. It may not be the type of component that would be in a default schematic library, you may need to create it yourself, assuming Proteus has the tools to do so.

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