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I would like to experiment with audio applications using MEMS microphone. The problem is i cannot think of a way to solder these microphones on a pcb as PCB prototype manufacturers that i know won't do re-flow soldering for a single board.

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closed as too broad by PeterJ, Daniel Grillo, Dave Tweed May 16 '16 at 11:34

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ What is your question and what device are you considering? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 16 '16 at 9:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka I am trying to figure out ways to solder a microphone similar to this onto a pcb pololu.com/file/0J299/SPM0404HE5H.pdf \$\endgroup\$ – Kaushik Wavhal May 16 '16 at 10:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are very many tutorials on the web for doing prototype reflow soldering, using hot-air tools, toaster ovens, electric hotplates, etc. You need to do some research and then come back here if you have a specific question. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed May 16 '16 at 11:34
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One option would be to buy a hot-air reflow station, e.g. Sparkfun. Chinese-manufactured ones are reasonably inexpensive, and some are of good enough quality for prototype/home use.

You might also consider dead-bug prototyping with some 30-gauge wire or so and a good quality hand solder with a fine tip. This involves turning chips upside down and soldering pins directly to parts or using wire, without necessarily using a board (you can solder the wires to a PCB or a copper-clad board of some kind if you want). This can require fine wire and a lot of skill for parts with small, fine-pitched pins.

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