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The photo below shows a part that I am trying to find a specification for. I suspect that it is a microcontroller, and is part of a larger device that is essentially a timer. It clearly bears the National Semiconductor logo.

enter image description here

However, I cannot find this device via searching, and it doesn't seem to fit into the National Semiconductor device naming conventions. Is it plausible that this might be a part custom-made by N.S. for the larger device manufacturer? Is this kind of thing done?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think is a Freesacale MCU \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Buršič May 18 '16 at 10:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ What does the device that the part is in do? Is it a power supply? Thermostat? \$\endgroup\$ – CHendrix May 18 '16 at 10:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, this kind of thing is done! I don't have enough experience to speculate on the rest, but if you have enough money, you can get custom part numbers. \$\endgroup\$ – AndrejaKo May 18 '16 at 10:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @CHendrix - a timer \$\endgroup\$ – Gremlin May 18 '16 at 10:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ @MarkoBuršič: NatSemi manufacturing Freescale parts? \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 18 '16 at 10:38
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It is... I wouldn't say "common" per se, but not unheard of for semiconductor manufacturers to create or manufacture custom (ASIC) or custom-screened (although standard under the hood) parts for very large customers with no publicly trackable part number. At a cost, of course.

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I suspect it's a 'house numbered' microcontroller, probably an OTP or mask-programmed COP8 series.

See if this matches the use of the pins:

enter image description here

It's not unusual for such chips to be house numbered if they're supplied in relatively large quantity.

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Custom or semi-custom parts with the customer's "house number" are quite common. Especially with integrated circuits. It is not unusual to open a mass-produced item and find chips that have only OEM part numbers.

There have been a few cases where the community has "reverse-engineered" a mystery part in a particularly venerated product (legendary synthesizers, popular game consoles, etc.) but that is extraordinarily rare.

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