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According to the FCC:

The following devices are subject only to the general conditions of operation in §§15.5 [Dealing with certification] and 15.29 [Dealing with power] and are exempt from the specific technical standards and other requirements contained in this part. The operator of the exempted device shall be required to stop operating the device upon a finding by the Commission or its representative that the device is causing harmful interference. Operation shall not resume until the condition causing the harmful interference has been corrected. Although not mandatory, it is strongly recommended that the manufacturer of an exempted device endeavor to have the device meet the specific technical standards in this part.

And one of the following items is:

(h) Digital devices in which both the highest frequency generated and the highest frequency used are less than 1.705 MHz and which do not operate from the AC power lines or contain provisions for operation while connected to the AC power lines. Digital devices that include, or make provision for the use of, battery eliminators, AC adaptors or battery chargers which permit operation while charging or that connect to the AC power lines indirectly, obtaining their power through another device which is connected to the AC power lines, do not fall under this exemption.

My question is: Is there any 1 MHz (or low frequency oscillator ) that specifically is designed to not generate harmonic frequencies, so that the resulting device can fall under this exemption?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ How would that help? You can't connect it to any digital device and maintain that same lack of harmonic frequencies. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe May 19 '16 at 2:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @pipe But if it (the digital device) is switching at low enough frequencies....... \$\endgroup\$ – DarthRubik May 19 '16 at 2:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ If it did, you wouldn't need a special oscillator. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe May 19 '16 at 3:10
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This ruling is targeted to allow operation using what is commonly know as a 32,768 Hz watch crystal. These are typically tuning fork type crystals. And yes, digital watches fall under that bailiwick.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Does that mean that 32.768 kHz systems typically do not produce any harmonics greater than 1.705 MHz? \$\endgroup\$ – DarthRubik May 19 '16 at 21:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DarthRubik No, it just means that they can be designed to not do that. \$\endgroup\$ – placeholder May 19 '16 at 21:08
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No. There is nothing you can do with the design of an oscillator that will prevent the "resulting device" from failing that regulation. Because it is almost completely dependent on the "resulting device" and has almost nothing to do with the oscillator.

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