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This question already has an answer here:

How much amps (maximum) would be flowing through a 5 meter Cat 5/6 Ethernet cable with 1000Base-T speed (IEEE 802.3ab, 5-PAM coding, so voltage levels vary between +- 2V, 1V, 0V)?

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marked as duplicate by PeterJ, Dave Tweed May 19 '16 at 15:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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This answer https://electronics.stackexchange.com/a/36730/2228 suggests 60ma. Obviously it's alternating at high speed. But what will you do with this information?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I need the information for a circuit with transistors, which is not fully designed yet. The transistor and a ethernet line would be connected in parallel so that I can pull the data stream to ground (to disconnect the ethernet connection) \$\endgroup\$ – swinja123 May 19 '16 at 15:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ethernet uses a transformer-isolated, balanced line which is NOT referenced to ground. A "parallel transistor pulling to ground" seems like a doubtful scheme. Furthermore introducing such a connection will likely disturb the finely-tuned balance of the data path. The actual signal current flowing through the pair is the least of your concerns. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard Crowley May 19 '16 at 15:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's not completely unworkable for short bits of ethernet on your desk, if you short both sides of a pair to the same point and call it ground. \$\endgroup\$ – pjc50 May 19 '16 at 15:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ It worked with a first test circuit (It cut off Pings and put the interface down) but I wanted to calculate the appropriate Amps and Voltages to further optimize it. Thank you for your replies :) \$\endgroup\$ – swinja123 May 19 '16 at 15:51

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