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I have a component on a PCB we are analyzing to identify components. While we have identified mostly everything on the board, there are three components labelled with the reference designator "N". I have thoroughly searched for what this could mean and the only place I could find any mention of this symbol is this IEEE site, where it just labels "N" as an "equipment subdivision" (Page 211).

Does this mean it is a custom component? I will attach a picture of the board we are studying, where you can see two ("N1" and "N3") of the mysterious components with "GR-2-103" written on them and the other "N2" component with the same long yellow shape on the far right top.

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

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N1, N2 andd N3 appear to me to be single-in-line (SIP) resistor packs - several resistors in one package. I would normally use R or RP as reference designators for them.

Your "inseparable assemblies" P1 and P2 are potentiometers (variable resistors). I would use R or RV as reference designators for them.

Your "terminal board" would normally be called "terminal block"

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    \$\begingroup\$ They are being labelled "N" because they are resistor networks. \$\endgroup\$ May 21, 2016 at 11:22
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Those are 10kohm ("103") resistor networks. The designator for them is usually "RN", but only using "N" would not be a terrible problem.

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