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It is possible to exist more than 1 color code for same resistance-value. I doubt, is there any convention about use only one of them (while manufacture) .

Example : Say an 1 ohm resistor could be expressed as Black-Brown-Black (01*10^0) simply, but when i buy 1 ohm resistors, i always found Brown-Black-Golden (10*10 ^(-1)) being sold.

Example of more than one possible codes for same resistor Example of more than one possible codes for same resistor

Now, i want to know, are the all possible codes correct? or there are some conventions about it?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Non integer values won't work using a leading zero. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 21 '16 at 8:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Now i got it. That means the manufacturer indicating in-this way, they're selling 1.0 Ohms , and not 1.1 or 1.2 or such. They're providing the significant-zero after the decimal point in this way. \$\endgroup\$ – Always Confused May 22 '16 at 3:01
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I would suspect this is done so that there are more significant figures available. For example, you can express a 1.2\$\Omega\$ resistor as Brown, Red, Gold, Gold

But it would not be possible to express this without the third Gold color band.

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The first digit is never a zero for standard resistors, so there is a unique code for each value.

Sometimes 0\$\Omega\$ resistors have a single black band.

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It's a form of scientific notation: -

enter image description here

If you only have two digits for "a" you cannot express (say) 2.2 with a leading zero. Consistency is the key word.

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