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Is it as simple as rewinding the field coils with twice the number of turns and wire half the cross-sectional area of the original? or would the armature coils also need to be rewound as well?

The motor is rated 120V, 200W. I live in SE Asia, so wall voltages are 240V. I do have a voltage transformer, I just wanted to know what is involved in converting the motor to run on a different voltage.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ here's the thing, it's just a personal project I want to take on. nothing to lose by doing it. I just want to know what needs to be done to an AC series motor for it to run on a higher voltage \$\endgroup\$ May 23, 2016 at 6:25

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You do not tamper with the motor. You buy a step-down transformer rated for the current the motor needs. Get the voltage and current ratings of the motor, then just search the web for 'step-down' transformers that match your 230 to 240 vac line voltage on the primary side, and 120vac on the secondary side.

The transformer needs to handle the start-up current as well (it may be listed on the motor), so it maybe rated for twice the motor run current - or more. They are plentiful and have many sources and should not cost much. They are a quick and safe solution.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It would be nice if you could explain why the OP can't do what he asked, instead of just saying "don't do it!" \$\endgroup\$
    – DoxyLover
    May 22, 2016 at 3:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Re-winding the rotor and stator coils of a motor are no job for an amateur. It is rather a case of "if you have to ask, you shouldn't try it." \$\endgroup\$ May 22, 2016 at 4:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Not to mention, even if you can, doesn't mean you should. Engineering is about finding the simplest solution, and rewinding the motor is largely more complex than a simple properly rated transformer. \$\endgroup\$ May 22, 2016 at 4:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ The rotor and stator winding's are often held in place by a shellac or epoxy coating to prevent winding "chatter" or "buzz". It is extremely difficult to peel away these winding's. They are meant to be permanent. \$\endgroup\$
    – user105652
    May 22, 2016 at 19:42
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Re-winding the rotor and stator coils is not a reasonable option. The step-down transformer (or auto-transformer) is the PROPER method.

Since it is a "universal" motor it runs on DC, so you could try simply rectifying your 220V mains using a half-wave rectifier. But that would yield only half-power, and we don't know your application to know whether that is a practical solution or not.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The Half wave diode may not be legal in some countries.There were allegations that the DC current that is drawn through the mains wiring network causes more corrosion problems .There is also the possibility of street transformer flux issues. \$\endgroup\$
    – Autistic
    May 22, 2016 at 4:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Let say its illegal, how possibly the utility supplier can trace it to the one who doing it? \$\endgroup\$ May 22, 2016 at 6:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @soosaisteven: (1) Using a DC-capable clamp current meter. Very quick and simple. (2) Using harmonic analysis on current measurement. There will be no even harmonics on a symmetrical load. There will with half-wave rectification. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    May 22, 2016 at 7:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ I understand that part... But to do this they got to probe the lead wires into each house fed by that one transformer... Do they have another easy way? \$\endgroup\$ May 22, 2016 at 8:33
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You'd have to re-wind all the windings in the motor. Usually this is not worth doing, especially on such a small motor, use a transformer or thyristor speed speed control.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ it's just for learning purposes, so it's a little worth doing for me anyways. now that you've mentioned both the armature and field need to be rewound, should it be by rewinding them both with twice the amount of turns? \$\endgroup\$ May 23, 2016 at 11:07

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